Center for Engineered Materials and Manufacturing (CEMM)

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A 3D rendering of a network of hierarchical fractal-like metamaterials.
A 3D rendering of a network of hierarchical fractal-like metamaterials.

Additive Manufacturing for Novel Capabilities

The Center for Engineered Materials and Manufacturing (CEMM) spans multiple laboratories, innovating additive manufacturing techniques to create structural and functional materials with novel capabilities. By leveraging knowledge from across disciplines, CEMM can penetrate all areas related to additive manufacturing: tools and process development, materials synthesis and processing, architecture design and optimization, plus characterization of product properties. The center also serves as an incubator, training future additive manufacturing talents.

A rectangular object created from hollow-tube lattice.
The initial acrylate structure is removed after plating to create a hollow-tube lattice with features spanning seven orders of magnitude.

CEMM Capabilities

CEMM's research facility is equipped with customized and industrial grade additive manufacturing equipment for polymers, ceramics, and metals, as well as onsite characterization capabilities. Design and optimization capabilities include modeling and simulation of architected materials.

Additive manufacturing capabilities in our center can be divided into four categories based on their feedstock materials and solidification mechanisms:

  • Extrusion-based additive manufacturing 
    • Directly extruding materials or jetting binders to pattern 3D shapes 
    • Direct-ink writing 
    • Binder-jet printing 
    • Fused deposition modeling  
  • Light-based additive manufacturing 
    • Projection micro-stereography  
    • Two-photon polymerization  
  • Energy-based additive manufacturing 
    • Selective laser melting  
  • Field-based additive manufacturing 
    • Electrophoretic deposition 
    • Acoustic printing 
    • Materials synthesis and processing capabilities for additive manufacturing applications   

What We’re Working On

In the July 2016 issue of Nature Materials, LLNL researchers report 3D printing fractal-like lattices with features ranging from the nanometer to centimeter scale to build a nickel-plated metamaterial with a high elasticity not found in any previously built metal foams or lattices. The unprecedented scalability in 3D-printed architectures of arbitrary geometry opens the door to super-strong, ultra-lightweight, and flexible metallic materials for aerospace, the military, and the automotive industry.

Read More

Interested in Collaborating? Email Us: eng-cemm-collab [at] llnl.gov

Want to Partner with Us?

Let's make something incredible together

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Three people work together on a gas vacuum system
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